Global aquaculture transformed thanks to investment by the Iowa Soybean Association

Two thousand years of aquaculture in China was revolutionized by one simplistic system developed by the U.S. soybean industry and supported with an investment by Iowa soybean farmers.

That’s the takeaway that soybean leaders celebrated while visiting the first Intensive Pond Aquaculture (IPA) farm in China as participants in an all-Iowa ag trade mission July 19-28.

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Without a checkoff investment by the Iowa Soybean Association (ISA), that success may never have been realized, said ISA Director Jeff Jorgenson.

"With 40 percent of China imports coming from the U.S. the IPA system is going to enhance fish production into a higher inclusion of soybean meal in fish diets," said Jorgenson, an ISA director and soybean farmer from Sidney and member of the delegation visiting China. "The investment by soy checkoff dollars again will turn into more of Iowa soybeans being utilized around the world."

Two thousand years of aquaculture in China was revolutionized by one simplistic system. That is the takeaway that soybean leaders celebrated while visiting the first Intensive pond aquaculture (IPA) farm in China located outside of Shanghai.

China has practiced aquaculture for more than 2,000 years. But it wasn’t until 2013 that aquaculture was paired with IPA technologies to create a system that produced healthier fish and uses fewer resources while being fed sustainable soy grown in the United States and other countries.

The ISA in partnership with the U.S. soybean industry funded research to develop the IPA system, which has been provided to China in a technology transfer. The IPA system has been proven to triple the yield of farmed fish in existing Chinese ponds while greatly reducing the environmental impact.

"Iowa soybean farmers were the first to sponsor this technology. We are very appreciative for their generosity and support," said Jim Zhang, United States Soybean Export Council (USSEC) program manager for aquaculture in China.

IPA technology requires minimal modification to existing ponds and creates a zero water discharge system that increases yield with no negative impacts on the environment.

Water is diverted around the pond to keep it mixed. Fish are housed in concrete pens that have screens on the front and back. The circulating water creates a current that mimics the natural habitat of the fish while also removing waste manure. Other species of fish are contained in the ponds outside of the pens to feed off the nutrients.

The IPA technology also allows China’s limited water resources to be conserved and recycled. Excess waste can also be removed and used as fertilizer or biofuels.

"In 2013 when the project started there were only three cells. Now there are over 3,000 cells in China with the total construction investment, not mentioning the operational investment, is worth around $44 million," Zhang said.

The sky could be the limit for the new technology. Zhang believes the number of fish raised using the IPA system could double in the next five years.

"This technology helps to break all the bottlenecks that face China's aquaculture," he said. "Bottlenecks like labor, water, environmental and food safety."

Governor Kim Reynolds, who is leading the delegation, toured the site and fed some of the thousands of carp species raised on the farm.

"I'm extremely proud of the ISA to think that they were the original investor in this IPA. It is a win-win. Our farmers benefit from the increased use of soy, and these farms are reducing costs and expanding,

"It is a great example of what we want to see happen on the trade missions that we are a part of,” Reynolds added.

Karey Claghorn, Chief Operating Officer for the ISA, also toured the aquaculture farm powered by U.S. soybean meal.

"IPA has revolutionized the industry. It changed the way they could look at their in-pond systems," she said. "It allows them to improve water quality and environmental footprint. It was an exciting investment for us as it has worked out."

Originally published for the Iowa Soybean Association. Read more articles at www.iasoybeans.com.

Aquaculture tour shows power of the soybean checkoff

United States soy meal is finding an ever expanding market south of the border thanks to aquaculture.

This week about 50 growers, state soybean staff and United States Soybean Export Council (USSEC) employees spent the week in Villahermosa, Mexico learning about existing opportunities and future expansion of the industry.

Tim Bardole, ISA director from Rippey, feeds a pen of tilapia at the Regal Springs Tilapia farm in Mexico.  

Tim Bardole, ISA director from Rippey, feeds a pen of tilapia at the Regal Springs Tilapia farm in Mexico. 

“We’re here to help show the soybean farmers in the U.S. where their checkoff dollars are being invested, how they are being invested and ultimately where much of their soybean meal ends up,” Colby Sutter, marketing director for the global aquaculture program with USSEC, said while leading a tour at Regal Springs Tilapia. “It’s crucial to be able to see first-hand how relationships have been forged in international marketing programs where ultimately we are creating a preference and demand for U.S. soy.”

Regal Springs Tilapia is a company that specializes in 100 percent lake grown fish with farms in southern Mexico, Honduras, Brazil and Indonesia. The fish are raised in deep water lakes in large floating nets that take advantage of water currents to maintain fresh water and give the fish a more natural habitat.

According to Geraldo Martinez, production manager for Regal Springs Tilapia, the company will produce 30,000 pounds of fish out of two lakes in Mexico per year. That equates to 30 million fish weighing about one kilogram each. The secret ingredient to the success of their business is the soybean meal used in the formulated diets of the fish.

“For one kilo of fish we will need 1.95 kilos of feed,” Martinez said. “So if you are talking 30,000 tons of fish you will need just short of 60,000 tons of feed in a year.”

Martinez said that about 25 to 30 percent of the feed ration was made using soy meal. He sights free trade agreements with the U.S. as an incentive in buying soy grown and crushed in America.

The company exports 75 percent of their fish to customers outside of Mexico. Of that, 95 percent of the fish are exported to the U.S. and the other five percent go to European markets. Costco is one of the major retailers in the U.S. that sells the tilapia.

April Hemmes and Tim Bardole, both directors for the Iowa Soybean Association, attended the aquaculture educational opportunity and were impressed with how U.S. soy meal is being used.

“It’s an excellent opportunity for me as a soy producer in the United States,” Bardole said. “It’s a win, win. There’s a growing market out there for fish and we grow soybeans. We can help supply the soybeans and the some of the expertise to get feeds just right. And to see that back on the shelves in the U.S. shows that the soybean checkoff has done great things for the U.S. farmer and the public.”

Hemmes agreed with Bardole and found the tour of the aquaculture facility important with her new roles in the soybean community. She said that as a new USB director and a new ISA director it was important to see companies like Regal Springs to learn how the checkoff is helping to open new markets.

“To hear that there are ten percent increases each year in some of these countries producing aquaculture is huge and a great potential for soybeans,” Hemmes said. “I see it (aquaculture) as a very important market and a way that we can increase exports and uses for soybeans in a neighboring country.”

She went on to say that seeing the fish pens, hatchery and packaging facility gave her an appreciation of the detail Regal Springs uses to produce high-quality tilapia for their customers.

“What was amazing was to see the tiny fish eggs hatching before our eyes and talking with a feed expert about how precise the feed has to be,” Hemmes said.  You see these little fish the size of a pinhead, and you realize that they have to get everything they need in one little bite and how precise that needs to be for them to grow and survive.”